Reply To: Clergy Studies Book Reading Series 2020 Egyptian Mysteries Vol 3 Priests and Priestesses of Ancient Egypt

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Bastu Heryt Merri Net
Report Assignment for Book: Egyptian Mysteries – Vol. 3: Priests & Priestesses of Ancient Egypt
Due Date: Nov. 2021- Pages 36-38

In this portion of the text poignant points are revealed on what it means to live by truth, based on the understanding that “reality is good and delusion is not.” This is further clarified by identifying illusory, delusional behavior as “shems-ab,” meaning to live by one’s heart’s desires rather abiding truth, or “shems-maat”, meaning to follow the truth. This “shems-ab” behavior is intensified due to “suga,” described as foolish and immature behavior, and stands as an obstacle to “shems-maat” which leads to truth. The point is made that “cognitive dissonance” is necessary, but that there must be a level of maturity to move beyond the dissonance in order to realize reality from delusion.

Those inclined to shems-ab will find it difficult to follow a spiritual path of a mystical tradition. The text quotes: “The shemsu-ab are self willed people who lack the capacity to “sedjem” (heed-listen and obey) the teaching because they have allowed their intellect to become dull, atrophied – umet-ab-dull, dense, dull of heart.” (Ashby, p. 36) In fact, shems-ab is just another guise of the ego personality under the false pretense of being in control, which is clearly delusional.

What enables this delusional behavior, as made reference to in the text, is “suga” derived from “sug-mes,” meaning a suckling babe or “helpless child.” This vividly describes the immature and foolish nature of one who seeks “truth” in worldly sense pleasures and/or material wealth. Such a person is truly a weak candidate for the high teachings of Shetaut Neter or any mystical spiritual traditions.

It is human nature to doubt, refute, or deny that which challenges what one believes to be “truth.” In psychological circles this is termed “cognitive dissonance,” and the text quotes thus: “Cognitive dissonance is a necessary feature in life. Sometimes life offers shocking situations, the purpose of which is to show us that there is another way to look at life.” (Ashby, p.36) But if one lacks the maturity to open their ears to truth, it is as if they are a child who plugs their fingers into their ears so they don’t have to listen. For such people only the dogmatic, faith based teachings of orthodox Christianity, Judaism, Islam, etc. will suffice.

Therefore, when qualifying one for consideration into the mystical tradition of Shetaut Neter, there should be a level of maturity that can rise above dissonance, which would allow one to grow beyond their shems-ab (heart’s desires) and eventually allow them to live by truth/reality versus delusion. To conclude, a final quote from the text reads: “In reality, the higher learning experience is indeed a loss of something; that something is ignorance, and its ensuing capacity to lead human beings to suffering. In its place there is a gain of higher understanding, and with that comes peace and insight into the secrets of the universe including the discovery of immortality and infinity.” (Ashby, p.38)

Htp,

Bastu Heryt